Free Range Chicken Enchiladas- Doyle Family Farm

June 08, 2015

A convenient and delicious meal for the whole family.  The Doyles are offering a frozen pan of chicken enchiladas, which serves four people for $20, see one serving size below.  This great gluten-free dish is made with homemade enchilada sauce, homegrown free ranging chickens, and corn tortillas.  

chicken enchiladachicken enchilada


Red Butte Farms Artisan Cheeses - Janet Smithson

June 08, 2015

Red Butte Farms Artisan Cheese List 6/12

Limited Quantities

Newest cheese image is below, please see previous postings for images of other cheeses

-Young Fresh Crottin de Chevre 5-6 oz puck $9.00

Aged for two weeks with a bloomy rind.  Soft, lemony and fresh now, this one can be aged longer for a more distinctive flavor.

cheeseycheesey

 

-Chugwater-two petite buttons-$7.00

A mold ripened, bloomy rind cheese, the inspiration for this cheese comes from Inverness, a cheese made by the Cow Girl Creamery in Pt. Reyes, California.

 

-Queso Fresco-7 oz Wedge $7.00

Mexican style fresh pressed cheese. Great on tacos.  Will melt.

 
 

-Cajeta-Goat Milk Caramel-8 oz jar $6.50

Sweet and slightly tangy caramel sauce. Packed with a hint of cinnamon. Indulge yourself for breakfast and pour it over oatmeal.  Bake it into brownies or spoon it over ice cream.

 

-Cabecou-4oz button, $8.00

Slightly aged chevre packed with herbes de Provence and bay leaves, chive blossoms and peppercorns in a blend of extra virgin olive oil and grapeseed oils.  When the cheese is gone use the oil to make a salad dressing or use for dipping bread or tossing pasta. Pasteurized

 

-Chevre-8oz $8.00

This is the cheese that everyone associates with goat cheese.  Lemony, tangy and very mild.  Not like anything you’ll find in the grocery stores.  This cheese will change your mind if you’re a goat cheese hater. Pasteurized.  Packed in a deli tub.

 

-Feta Cheese-6 oz $7.00

Classic goat milk feta. A bit young it will improve with age. Whey based brine. Salty and a little goaty. Great cheese for salads and pizza. If you find it too salty soak in milk or water for a little while. Pasteurized.

 

 


Red Butte Farms Artisan Cheeses- Janet Smithson

May 31, 2015

Red Butte Farms Artisan Cheese List - See previous postings for additional cheese images

Limited Quantities

Cabecou-4oz button, $8.00

Slightly aged chevre packed with herbes de Provence and bay leaves, chive blossoms and pepper corns in a blend of extra virgin olive oil and grape seed oils. When the cheese is gone use the oil to make a salad dressing or use for dipping bread or tossing pasta. Pasteurized

 

Chevre-8oz $8.00

This is the cheese that everyone associates with goat cheese. Lemony, tangy and very mild. Not like anything you’ll find in the grocery stores. This cheese will change your mind if you’re a goat cheese hater. Pasteurized. Packed in a deli tub.

 

Chugwater-two petite buttons-$7.00

A mold ripened, bloomy rind cheese, the inspiration for this cheese comes from Inverness, a cheese made by the Cow Girl Creamery in Pt. Reyes, California.

cheche

 

Queso Fresco-7 oz Wedge $7.00

Mexican style fresh pressed cheese. Great on tacos. Will melt.

 

Feta Cheese-6oz $7.50

Classic goats milk feta. A bit young it will improve with age. Whey based brine. Salty and a little goaty. Great cheese for salads and pizza. If you find it too salty soak in milk or water for a little while. Pasteurized.

 

Cajeta-Goats Milk Caramel-8 oz jar $6.50

Sweet and slightly tangy caramel sauce. Packed with a hint of cinnamon. Indulge yourself for breakfast and pour it over oatmeal. Bake into brownies or spoon it over ice cream.

chch


Red Butte Farms Artisan Cheese- Janet Smithson

May 24, 2015

Red Butte Farms Artisan Cheese List

Limited Quantities- First Come First Serve

Cabecou (see image on last week's posting) - 4oz button, $8.00

Slightly aged chevre packed with herbes de Provence and bay leaves, chive blossoms and pepper corns in a blend of extra virgin olive oil and grape seed oils.  When the cheese is gone use the oil to make a salad dressing or use for dipping bread or tossing pasta. Pasteurized

 

Chevre (see image on last week's posting) -8oz $8.00

This is the cheese that everyone associates with goat cheese.  Lemony, tangy and very mild.  Not like anything you’ll find in the grocery stores.  This cheese will change your mind if you’re a goat cheese hater. Pasteurized.  Packed in a deli tub.

 

Red Chile Queso Fresco-7 oz Wedge $7.00

Mexican style fresh pressed cheese with chile caribe. Great on tacos.  Will melt.

qfqf


Mama Bakes Bread- Elena Tsentas

May 24, 2015

This week Elena Tsentas, owner of Mama Bakes Bread, is offering her delicious home-made bread. Find details at her website: 

 

 

mama bakesmama bakes

 

 

http://mamabakesbread.weebly.com


 

She is offering members a discount off her listed prices for breads ordered this week.

 

Elena soaks her grains and describes the benefits of this process here:

 

"Soaking grains to improve your absorption of minerals is a popular food preparation technique among lovers of traditional foods, a practice made popular by Sally Fallon in her book Nourishing Traditions. Fallon discovered research that showed that if grains are soaked in an acidic medium, phytic acid will be reduced and the minerals in the grains will be unlocked so that you can benefit from them.  phytic acid prevents the grain from being digested. You see, inside the grain there’s amazing stuff like fiber, nutrients, minerals & enzymes. I mean, that’s why we eat whole grains, right? To get all the amazing goodness inside! But, we can’t get very much of that unless the phytic acid is broken down before we eat it.


Each of my breads is soaked overnight to enhance the bodies’ ability to absorb these beneficial nutrients. The whole wheat bread is soaked with milk or yogurt and my sourdough is fermented with a wild yeast starter that I created and have nourished for over 1 year."


440 Strawberry Rhubarb Pie and Pints of Cream

May 24, 2015

Pies made at the 440 are $12 each

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Top your fresh pie off with a pint of fresh cream....

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$5/pint- jar returned;

$6/pint no return of jar.

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Shelley Gardens- Sherry Shelley

May 17, 2015

Shelley Gardens will occasionally provide fresh produce, flower bouquets, home brewed kombucha and bakery products for 440 members. 

This week, the offerings are:

rhubarb at $3 for 1+ lb bundle

chive bundles for $1 

 

 

shelleyshelley

 

Who doesn’t love fresh rhubarb pie?  Add a bit of grated orange zest or a cup of little fresh strawberries for a different taste or stick with just rhubarb and top your slice with a scoop of vanilla ice cream for a yummy treat!  Try this unique summery salad:

2 C sliced rhubarb
water
sugar
1 small box strawberry Jello
1 C cold water
1 C cold orange juice

Cook rhubarb in water with sugar for 5 minutes.  Dissolve jello in hot rhubarb mixture.  Stir in cold water and orange juice, pour into serving bowl and refrigerate to set.  Especially good with cold fried chicken!

 

And chives of course are great in deviled eggs, scrambled eggs, and fresh green salads


Red Butte Farms Artisan Goat Cheese - Janet Smithson

May 17, 2015

Red Butte Farms Artisan Cheese List 

Limited Quantities: First Come First Serve

 

Feta Cheese-6oz, $7.50

Classic goats milk feta. A bit young it will improve with age. Whey based brine. Salty and a little goaty. Great cheese for salads and pizza. If you find it too salty soak in milk or water for a little while. Your choice of soft or firm. Pasteurized.

Raw milk feta will be a future offering.

 

image3Feta

 

Cabecou- 4oz button, $8.50

Slightly aged chevre packed with herbes de Provence and bay leaves, chive blossoms and pepper corns in a blend of extra virgin olive oil and grape seed oils. When the cheese is gone use the oil to make a salad dressing or use for dipping bread or tossing pasta.

 

image2 (1)Cabecou

 

Chevre- 8 oz, $8.00

This is the cheese that everyone associates with goat cheese. Lemony, tangy and very mild. Not like anything you’ll find in the grocery stores. This cheese will change your mind if you’re a goat cheese hater. Pasteurized. Packed in a deli tub.

Available in the following flavors:

Plain-dress it up as you see fit.

Chive blossom-adorned with garden fresh chives and chervil.

 

image1 (1)Chevre


Doyle Farm- Rhubarb

May 10, 2015

This week the Doyles are offering rhubarb.  

Prices for fresh cut rhubarb without leaves are $2.00/ half pound bundle.

rubarbDoyle's RhubarbSONY DSC

A nice recipe utilizing rhubarb is from Sally Fallon's Nourishing Tradition's Cookbook, pg 538

 

Stewed Rhubarb

Ingredients:

  • 6 cups fresh rhubarb stalks (absolutely no leaves), cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 1 Tablespoon freshly ground ginger (less is fine, or even omit if you don’t like ginger)
  • 1/2 cup filtered water
  • 1/2 – 3/4 cup raw honey
  • 1 cup heavy cream, whipped with a touch of raw honey (or your sweetener of choice)

Preparation:

  1. Place rhubarb, ginger and water in a pan and bring to a boil.
  2. If you’re adding berries, add them now and reduce heat to a simmer and cook about 1 hour, stirring occasionally, until the rhubarb (and berries) disintegrates.
  3. Allow to cool and stir in honey to taste.
  4. Serve with a dollop of whipped cream, or fold in whipped cream into the cooled compote to make a mousse.
  5. If you made compote – it freezes very well. If you made mousse, try adding to an already baked and cooled pie crust!

Kombucha and Baby Aloe Plants

May 10, 2015

The 440 is offering cranberry and apple flavored Kombucha brewed with black and green teas this week.  Twelve or 24 oz jars are available as supplies last. Prices are:

12 oz. with jar & lid returned: $2.50; no return of jar and lid: $3.50

24 oz. with jar and lid returned $3.50; no return of jar and lid $4.50

For more information on Kombucha, please have a look at Sally Fallon's article below.  Kombucha is a fermented beverage containing caffeine.

http://gypsycowgirl.zenfolio.com/westonaprice-org-kvass-and-kombucha-gifts-from-russia--1-.pdf

 

kombuchaCranberry Kombucha: 24 and 12 oz.SONY DSC

 

 

Baby aloe plants in ceramic pots are also available from the 440, for $3 each.

cutting5cutting5

 

 


Red Butte Farms- Handmade Soap

May 02, 2015

Janet Smithson, from her farm up Squaw Creek Road, is offering her wonderful homemade soaps this week. 


image1Red Butte Farms Soaps


Bastille-$5.00 Very gentle on the skin, unscented. Saponified olive oil, coconut oil, and calendula infused sunflower oil, goat milk, carrot purée, mineral salt and lye  

Basic Milk Bar-$5.00 Nice everyday soap. Unscented  Saponified vegetable shortening, lard, olive oil and sunflower oil, goat milk, mineral salt and lye
   image2Janet Smithson's Goat Milk Soap




Chamomile Milk Bar-$4.00 smaller bar Saponified vegetable shortening, lard, olive oil and sunflower oil, goat milk, chamomile, mineral salt and lye.  
Honey Brown Sugar Oat-$5.00 Saponified vegetable shortening, lard, olive oil and sunflower oil, goat milk,honey, brown sugar, oatmeal, mineral salt and lye.  
Honey Brown Sugar On Rope-$5.00 Heart shaped soap with hemp twine hanger. Saponified vegetable shortening, lard, olive oil and sunflower oil, goat milk,honey, brown sugar, oatmeal, mineral salt and lye, lavender essential oil. Hemp twine.

IMG_1085IMG_1085

 


Lost Wells Cattle Company- Beef Liver

May 01, 2015

Bobby and Brendan Thoman raise all-natural beef on their family ranch northwest of Riverton, Wyoming. These brothers follow an impressive mineral and intensive grass-fed grazing program, which makes for naturally healthy and nutrient-dense beef as an end-product. See more information about their beef operation at their website: http://lostwellscattle.com

The Thomans offer a variety of beef cuts, but this week they are selling their high-quality beef liver.  The price for members is $4/lb. DSC00317Lost Wells Cattle- Beef Liver1.53 lb Liver

 

Please read the following article by holistic veterinarian Will Winter for the low-down on the health benefits of liver and Will's advice on preparation.  

 

How to Cook Liver for Liver-Haters...and WIN them Over!
 
                                                                          by Will Winter,DVM
 
 Liver? OMG! Run!!  If a chunk of liver could be a movie star, which if you have seen Toy Story, isn’t too much of a stretch, I’m thinking Mr. Liver would look like the beat-up young boxer Rocky Balboa, the big ol’ muscle-bound, gruff-speaking galoot with a heart of gold. Let’s face facts here, liver has been given a bad rap! Maybe only the twin table turn-offs,  Limburger cheese and lutefisk, have a worse food reputation. As you will soon see, Mr. Liver is usually served fresh, and therefore has nothing to do with these two fermented products, but I digress. At the risk of being a spoiler, this story has a happy ending!  In the end, and after ten hard rounds of getting savage punches and body blows, Rocky triumphs over the bad guys. Yay! let’s hear it for Mr. Liver, I mean, Rocky, no wait, I mean Mr. Liver!!! And, yes, I really do want Mr. Liver to win his way back to your table and to your heart as well.  
 
 
If you didn’t immediately freak out and if you are still reading along, I want you to know that I feel rather qualified to tell this story because I consider myself a specialist in getting liver-hating people to eat and enjoy liver! I will admit right here and now, though, that I know that I have my work cut out for me. So many people have been turned into haters that it really is a health and culinary tragedy. Many are so hardened and jaded they won’t even try my liver recipe even once, but this story is for those who might consider meeting me an inch or two closer than they were before. 
 
 Fortunately, I was never among the haters, I grew up in a farm family where wild game and all sorts of cuts from homegrown meats found their way to our skillet and table. Usually my dad and my uncles would compete to see who could be the first to snatch the tasty odd bits off the platter.  Luckily for me, both my parents were excellent home cooks as well, so we ate very well. My mother is still cooking at 97, she takes no prescriptions and will join me in admonishing you to “eat your liver!”
 
It’s my theory that there are two main reasons for the bad reputation liver has achieved. I’m talking to you now, liver-haters…. First of all, 99% of the liver being cooked in homes, and especially in restaurants, is wretched, deservedly-smelly and toxic. This is because it is almost always liver from confinement animals. That stuff could actually damage your health and I wouldn’t blame you at all for hating it.  Secondly, and equally problematic, I’ll bet that your mom has been cooking it all wrong! You will soon see how the cooking part can be easily cured. Lastly, and as if these are not reason enough, why would anyone (except a hater) curse a noble category of nutritionally-healing meats as “offal”?  What a travesty. I say we start calling organ meats “delicacies” or maybe just “num-nums”, who knows? 
 
All you liver-haters have plenty of company, many of you even make gagging sounds and gestures when someone mentions the very word. I work for one of the largest and best 100% grass-fed gourmet beef producers in the US, Cannon Falls, Minnesota’s very own Thousand Hills Cattle Company. In our local processing plant, we document the demise of liver lovers of the world. Liver’s reputation, mostly from the widely-circulated and erroneous myths, has turned off so many of our beef customers that we currently send the majority of our incredibly wholesome and tasty grass-fed liver into various raw pet food recipes. Oh, those lucky dogs and cats! They are getting our best delicacies!  So, it’s been my mission to correct this miscarriage of justice. You have been patient long enough so here's the secret:
 
HOW TO COOK LIVER FOR LIVER-HATERS
 
Absolute Rule #1:  You have to start with good liver! I'm going to aggravate some readers here, but you gotta call a spade a spade: I recommend that one avoid eating all feedlot liver, which is pretty toxic in all ways!. In fact, liver-haters will quickly remind you that, “hey, the liver is just a big bag of poisons, toxins and heavy metals”. Well, there’s some truth to that, but what if you kept those toxins out of the animal in the first place? We call that organic husbandry. Secondly, the liver does indeed “store” things, but, most of all, the liver stores good things, it stores fat-soluble vitamins, minerals and other tasty nutrients. The good guys vastly outweigh the bad guys too.  Ever wonder why cod liver oil is such a valuable medicine?  More about all this good news later.
 
Grass-fed or calf liver is almost always the best. Try for "organically-raised" or "beyond organic" if possible. Also “pastured pork”  liver is fantastic and it is very mild-flavored.  If you can find it, also try healthy lamb and goat liver. These animals are typically killed when very young, which means a sweeter, more-tender and more-delicious eating experience. When you buy liver, examine it carefully. It should be smooth as glass,  dark colored, a deep purplish red, it should have sharply-defined edges and a distinct firmness, not mucky or crumbly (ick), but not hard as a rock either. Avoid liver with yellow spots or blotches, and be particularly careful about poultry liver which is almost always yellowish. Don’t eat yellow snow or yellow liver! Birds that are truly free-range have dark, healthy and delicious liver. 
 
Here’s something that you probably didn’t know, the so-called “liver smell” that so many liver-haters are quick to point out, is actually not really liver! This foul odor is from the out-gassing of poisons, toxins and excess bodily waste products of commodity feedlot animal liver, these poor livers are actually slowly becoming necrotic (dying) as well.  No wonder people hate it. The liver of animals raised in this manner is so filled with toxins that most are in a state of pre-death just before they are harvested. As any chronic alcoholic is doomed to discover, the liver, which is the hardest-working organ in the body, takes the heat for an abusive lifestyle. 
 
All feedlot cattle, most dairy animals, and confinement hogs or birds, due to the push of excess grain, have a chronic condition known as hepatic lipidosis (fatty liver syndrome). Yes, I know, I just described foie gras, which almost deserves it’s own chapter, but let’s just say that I’m not here to recommend the typical foie gras to your plate either. Confined animals are usually more exposed to manure and  bad air as well.  You don't want to be eating it. If the animals are on antibiotics, wormers, insecticides, hormone implants or other drugs, guess where these drugs are concentrated? On the other hand, liver and other organ meat from deer, elk or moose is extremely delicious and nutritious if it's harvested and field-dressed properly. Never waste it. Even liver from trophy-sized animals is usually delicious. 
 
Cooking Tip #2  Cut it into very, very thin strips, I mean like 1/3" thick, maybe 1/2", and only a few inches long. Be sure to de-vein if there are some large ones (this step is for neophyte eaters only). N.B. If you are trying to make converts...cutting the liver into fine strips is the most important part of my story.   
 
Cooking Tip #3  Roll the wet strips in flour until covered   Optional: roll in raw egg first to create an extra-crispy crunchy KFC crust- I don't do this myself but it is delicious!  Also Optional: If you don't know the actual source of your liver (not a good thing, but sometimes necessary) you can pre-soak your liver in fresh milk for about 20 minutes which is said to help detoxify it and make it taste better. Easy and simple. 
 
Cooking Tip #4  In a skillet with a bit of bacon grease or lard, caramelize some onions, that means cook them until they are translucent then put them aside.
 
Cooking Tip #5  Fry the floured liver strips quickly in a cast-iron skillet with about 1/3-1/2" of very hot lard or bacon grease. If the grease doesn’t sizzle furiously when the strips are added it wasn’t hot enough.  For liver-haters, cook it almost well-done, for the rest of us, rare or medium-rare is ideal. Optional:  I like to add fresh crushed garlic (or minced garlic from a jar) to the lard before I fry the liver). This is good for your own liver and digestion,  plus it adds an amazing flavor. Seasalt and fresh-ground black pepper are nice additions as the liver fries. 
 
Cooking Tip #6  Spoon the fried onions over the top of the right-out-of-the-skillet liver and serve hot.  Optional: I love rare liver cooked this way, then served with a dollop of fresh horseradish, yum!  A good SIDE DISH to liver is a helping of sweet potatoes or yams drenched in butter. 
 
The obvious secret of chefs everywhere is that everything tastes great when breaded and fried in lard! Ha ha.   Making the strips thin is key for neophyte liver eaters. 
 
WHY SERVE LIVER
 
  Liver is one of the most important "super foods" of the world! We need to eat this powerful food. Again, it must be from drug-free, free-range non-toxic animals. Since it’s also super-concentrated we don’t need it every day, just one good meal a week is perfect.  Children need to eat liver even more than adults. Get them started on liver very young, like 2-3 years of age.  We would be hard-pressed to find anything healthier to put into our bodies. So, try to eat one good meal of liver every week, home-cooked is best, I don't trust the average restaurant. When I’ve cooked liver in this manner for guests I’ve actually had them reaching across the stove only to start gobbling it hot right out of the skillet and dripping with grease! Their body deficiencies are so profound they will consume a pound of it or more, without any other side dishes. I quite often crave it and have been know to have eaten it like this as well. 
 
By the way, the less one cooks liver, the better the nutrition and flavor. Over-cooking destroys nutrients in all foods. When recuperating from a serious chronic illness, auto-immune problems, or when detoxifying, one of the best ways to get healthy is to add raw liver to any blender drink. The liver of a healthy animal, contrary to popular belief is not a "bag of poisons", it's the organ in the body that stores vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and other powerful nutrients. Polar bear liver is the only species of liver that you cannot ever eat. Why? There is so much Vitamin A stored in it that one tiny serving can be fatal. The Innuits know this and will not eat it. The polar bears live at the top of an oceanic food chain of vital foods and therefore concentrate it like no other animal. 
 
WHY FRY IN LARD

 

There are only 4 cooking oils that will hold up under fry heat, LARD, TALLOW, COCONUT and PALM.  These are good oils, in spite of what the politically-correct doctors try to tell us. The so-called “vegetable” oils (they are not really from vegetables!), canola, soy, corn are the most prevalent, will breakdown quickly under heat. Don't heat butter either, it is quite fragile under heat. Butter is fine for lightly cooking, for example, eggs under low heat, but nothing more.  The now-popular vegetable oils are also all GMO products and they are all loaded with the inflammatory Omega 6.  Saturated fats are the only way to go, we need them in our diet. Heart attacks and even strokes were virtually unheard of before Crisco and Margarine came into the American diet. Crisco is a made-up word that stands for “Crystallized (hydrogenated) Cottonseed Oil”, a waste product that clever marketers turned into "pure white" death in a can. All the solid oils except pure virgin coconut and palm are hydrogenated, a terrible killer hidden within processed food. Unless you know the source of the lard, be careful because grocery store lard is usually hydrogenated and therefore turned into junk food. Try to buy lard directly from the farmer who raised the hogs. Farmer’s markets are usually a great source of quality lard and tallow. 

LEARNING MORE ABOUT EATING ORGAN MEATS
 
I’ve only scratched the surface of the topic of cooking with organ meat here. The main goal today is to overcome previous phobias and to teach new flavors by frying. The real fun begins once one has broken the ice and begun to savor the true flavor. I make several liver paté dishes that could also be gateway foods for novices.  I highly recommend them, especially my Three Root Liver Paté which includes the ground roots from fresh horseradish, ginger and tumeric. In addition to paté, I’ve made many great Olde World sausages using liver and other organ meats and they are equally amazing.  All the tips about selecting wholesome liver apply here as well. Part of the big fun is finding all the various particular recipes that excite your taste buds. In addition, raw liver may be used medicinally, the most common method is to introduce it into a yogurt smoothie drink. When liver of excellent quality is used, it’s virtually impossible to detect even several ounces of liver in each blender drink. The health benefits are stunning. 
 
Several recent trends have been turning the tide. Not the least of which is the Paleo food movement. Cave man knew about organ meats and relished them. Modern paleo doesn’t ask one to eat gobs of raw wooly mammoth liver, good luck with finding that at Whole Foods anyway, but the Paleo people want us to discover the modern versions and eat them in similar ratios and amounts. For most people who find a comfortable version of the Paleo diet will discover that it is a great way to lose excess blubber and regain good health, immunity and fertility. 
 
Obviously, we are a sick, diabetic, fat and cancer-ridden nation. Many people are looking for answers and one of the best places to dig is into the Pre-Modern world. We know from archeology and digs into ancient ruins that people were once taller than people throughout most of “modern” history, they also had larger brains and were assumed to be more intelligent. The nutrients in liver and other organ meats are particularly responsible for building strong brains, strong bodies. 
 
We know that grain-eating and domesticated agriculture has damaged our health in many ways. Dr. Weston A. Price a truth-seeking holistic dentist from the 1930‘s traveled the globe seeking all the basic guidelines of real nutrition truth. One of his most amazing finds was how ancient and indigenous cultures savored organ meats, including liver, brain, bone marrow and thymus glands. These nutrient-dense special foods were saved for those in most need, growing children, pregnant and nursing women and the elderly. One can read about these findings in his opus magnum “Nutrition and Physical Degeneration” which, along with many excellent books where you may find many more reasons and recipes for cooking organ meat, are for sale  at the acresusa.com bookstore. For more information about the physiological need cooking with oil and which ones to eat,  there are several great websites such as eatwild.commercola.com, and particularly  westonaprice.org
 
We've all been sold a nasty bill of goods. Eating wholesome liver on a regular basis heals every cell in the body but it’s particularly good for restoring, rebuilding and healing our own liver. Over a third of all Americans are taking statin drugs, a seriously liver-toxic drug! Most Americans have have a liver so-damaged and devitalized that they cannot destroy allergy particles, cannot detoxify environmental poisons, carcinogens or oxidative particles, nor can they digest their food properly. It’s time to take our American cuisine back! Perhaps we can do it one liver-hater at a time! 
 

 

WILL WINTER is a holistic herd health consultant and livestock nutritionist who hangs his hat in Minnesota. He is also a traveling teacher focusing on sustainable agriculture and traditional nutrition. He provides consultations and natural livestock supplies to farmers, and also raises his own pastured hogs, hair sheep and meat goats. 
 
612-756-1232

Doyle Family Farm- Free Range Chicken Eggs

May 01, 2015

DeeAnn and Steve Doyle have been very active in the Fremont Local Food Movement. They have a farm outside of Riverton, WY, and are always busy on restoration projects and progressive farming practices. The Doyle chickens are allowed to roam about the property to forage, and are also fed a ration of corn, barley, oyster shells, and kelp.

 

Doyle ChickensDoyle's Free-Ranging Chickens Doyle ChickensDoyle's Laying Hens

The Doyles will be providing eggs to 440 members as our laying hens will not produce eggs until this fall.  A dozen of the Doyle's eggs will be sold to members at $3.75 per dozen and will be available every week unless otherwise noted.


The 440 Box: Get Your Local Groceries

March 31, 2015

Greetings from Jen Faulkner on the 440 Ranch, located outside of Riverton, Wyoming. Please visit http://gypsycowgirl.zenfolio.com/about.html to read a little more about me and my history.  Kathleen O'Leary owns the 440, and I am partnering with her to make this place as productive as possible. Kathleen and I share a vision of growing, consuming, and selling nutrient dense local food, free of GMOs, pesticides, herbicides, and hormones. I left my conventional job as an environmental consultant, earlier this year to pursue my passions of growing wholesome food for myself and others.  My personal dream is deliver to local families each week, a box of groceries containing as many home-grown products as possible.

 

The recent passing of the Wyoming Food Freedom Bill now allows for the direct sale of many farm products between a farmer and consumer.  The 440 is home to a chicken processing wagon, and we are well-practiced in raising and processing free-ranging chickens.  The 440 will receive new flocks of meat birds and laying hens this spring.  This will allow us to offer high quality eggs and chickens later in the season.  We are also planting gardens, hosting all-natural grass-fed beef on a management intensive grazing system, and last but not least have two grass-fed dairy cows who will be freshening in the month of April. 

Daisy and AdoraDaisy and AdoraDaisy & Adora both Jersey cows, 4 and 5 years old respectively. The girls previously lived on the Doyle Family Farm, where they were grass fed. All cows on the 440 Ranch are grass-fed, hormone-free, and well-treated.

Raw milk is the first product the 440 will be selling, and membership space is limited.  The minimum amount required to enroll in a membership is one half gallon per week, with the maximum order amount based on supply.  Members orders will always be filled before additional outside sales are available.  By enrolling in the 440 membership program, you will not only gain access to the delivery of raw milk to your home, you will also have initial preference to purchase future ranch products.  The annual 440 membership fee is $50.  Each week an e-mail will be sent to members, with the ranch offerings included in that week's delivery. You decide what you would like in your box, and as a member, you will receive a 10% discount on your entire box.  There are several other local producers who are like-minded in the quality of food they grow, consume, and sell. In order to provide my customers with a good variety and ample supply of food in your box, I may enlist the help of my fellow farmers to feed you.  If the products offered are not from the 440, the farm of origin will be featured here with details on production.  This is a great way to grow our local food economy, and offers you the convenience of delivered fresh produce right to your door.

 

Membership Milk Prices (includes delivery)                             Drop Location & Farmer's Market Milk Prices (as available)     

$9/Gallon                                                                                          $10/Gallon

$4.50/Half Gallon                                                                            $5/Half Gallon

 

There are two options for obtaining food from the 440 Ranch.  One is to enroll in a 440 Membership, which guarantees you milk delivery every week.  The other choice is to visit the drop location or farmer's markets as supplies and the market season last. By enrolling in a membership, you will be eligible to have your 440 Box delivered to your home.  For home delivery, someone needs to be present to receive your box, or arrangements need to be made with me if you have an outside fridge etc. where I can leave your food.  Members will need to sign a liability waiver and provide glass jars, unless purchasing jars from me at $3.00 per half gallon jar.  Members are responsible for cleaning their jars, and will receive the same set back every other week.  If you do not wish to enroll in a membership, or if you live more than a mile from Lander or Riverton, you can meet me at the drop locations with the time and day of week yet to be determined.  Milk will only be available to non-members if the supply exists for that week.  You can have a membership and choose to pick up at the drop location, but you must be a member to receive home delivery.

 

It is important that members realize that farming is a seasonal enterprise. I will try to offer products for as many months of the year as possible, but will certainly slow down during the winter season. The dairy cows will be allowed to dry up Jan-March, as they and I will be looking forward to a break. Milk will not be available during these months, although milk can be frozen, so those wanting to be stocked through this season can order two gallons during the fall with anticipation of storing for the winter, if the supply is available.

 

The first ten people to enroll will be granted a membership, with all of those thereafter added to a wait list in the order of response. As my cows have yet to calve, I am unsure yet as to their production levels, and want to guarantee a consistent milk supply for members.  I anticipate being able to add many more members, but will be starting conservatively for the sake of those who commit early.  Milk delivery is anticipated to begin the first week of May, with membership fees due on April 15th.  Members will be e-mailed a monthly bill for any farm products received, with cash or check required for payment.  If you have more questions about me or the operation, please feel free to write or give me a call at 307-761-2556.  Future postings will include lots of information about the 440 and other related farm topics.  Thank you for your interest, and hope to feed you soon! Jen 

 

 


Soils

January 15, 2014

Soils is another area I have devoted much of my life to over the past several years, and for which I have a lot of passion. I am providing a link to my thesis http://gypsycowgirl.zenfolio.com/faulkner_thesis.pdf  for any gluttons or fellow soil nerds.

jenjen

My project was a study of different C-additions in the form of straw, wood chips, and a woodchip/compost mix applied at three rates each on two reclamation sites. One site was on the Jonah Field and the other on the Pinedale Anticline, both in Sublette County, Wyoming. I have attached the slides I presented during my thesis defense http://gypsycowgirl.zenfolio.com/comparison-of-c-rich-soil-additions-for-reclamation-of.pdf  These do not cover all of my results, and some are not self-explanatory, but they do give an overview of the project background, objectives, and key findings.

 

 

I have three galleries of photos related to soils. The first is from my thesis work and is entitled C-Addition Project:

The second is from another project I helped out on when I first got to grad school and its gallery is entitled Cattle Project:

The third soils gallery highlights pictures from Labs and Pits

 

The following link is a presentation on the soil pit we dug in Wamsutter:

http://gypsycowgirl.zenfolio.com/wamsutter-soill-pit.pdf

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